Hauer Pippin
California 1890's

Apples

Apple Trees

Malus pumila

Rarely do you see a home orchard missing the king of fruits. Apples today can be grown from the desert to the sea. Apples offer a remarkable diversity of flavors, colors and textures and have a lifespan that far exceeds many other fruit trees. The heirloom apple varieties that we offer fruit from mid July to late November, offering almost six months of superior flavors rarely found on the supermarket shelf. The home grown heirloom apple tree has historically been the central figure in the providing the nutrients and treats for past generations. Lastly, the suggested uses for each of these antique apple trees are just that-- suggestions. Experiment and have fun!  Our certified organic apple trees growing in our field range from 5-8 feet in height, and are pruned to approximately 4-5 feet in height when shipped. The great majority of our apple varieties range from 5/8" to 3/4" in caliper and most have side branches (feathered), which often leads to earlier fruiting. 


Harvest Tips: Each variety of apple has its harvest period and can be dependent upon weather conditions during the growing season. Mature apples are firm, crisp, and juicy with good color and a developed flavor characteristic of the variety. In red varieties, the color is not a good indicator of maturity. Red Delicious, for example, will turn red well before the fruit is ripe. Seed color is not always a reliable indicator either. Most apple varieties have brown seeds when mature, but the seeds may also brown weeks before it is really time to harvest. Premature apple picking may lead to fruit that is sour, starchy and generally unpalatable while harvesting apples too late results in a soft and mushy fruit. To ensure that you are harvesting your apples at the right time you may want to wait for a couple of apples to fall from the tree. Apple trees naturally drop their apples when they are ripe in order to self-seed and reproduce. Watch for an apple or two to drop from the tree to determine if they are ready to pick. To harvest apples, they should be fairly easy to pick from the tree with a simple upward twist of the apple itself. Try to avoid picking an apple by pulling the fruit straight down and tugging. If otherwise healthy fruits begin to fall off the tree, they are probably beginning to get a little too ripe and should probably be harvested as soon as possible.